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Google is innovating again, this time by introducing a new way for businesses of all shapes and sizes to raise their profile and connect with consumers on the web. Called Google Business View, the technology brings a business to life with a high quality, 360 degree, interactive virtual tour that lets consumers experience and explore panoramic views of retail shops, restaurants, clubs, galleries, event spaces, gyms, services, and facilities of all kinds. The virtual tour appears on the businesses’ website, and – here is the kicker – is  visible on Google Search results, Google Maps, and Google+. The images can also be used for various other advertising and marketing purposes.

The prime movers of Google Business View are a small and select cadre of photographers – dubbed Google Trusted Photographers – who are stringently trained to take high-quality photographs of interiors and facilities, and certified to access the Google technology and know-how that turns the pictures into a dramatic panoramic interactive showcase for potential customers. It is their expertise, combined with Google’s power, that can make companies standout.

Recently, I had a chance to speak with a prolific and successful Google Trusted Photographer, Jeffrey Rosenberg, who has brought Google Business View to several businesses on the North Shore of Long Island, New York. His recent photographic shoots have run the gamut from large and extensive venues — such as a renowned golf club and a venerable catering hall — to more contained locations including a dental office, an eyeglass store, and a hair salon.

JeffRosenberg3

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anseladams

“You don’t take a photograph, you make it” -Ansel Adams

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Photographer JLPH / Cultura RF
Photographer JLPH / Cultura RF

It’s tempting to say that in 2014 Craft is big business, but of course Craft is always small business.

So when was it that we moved from the world of anonymous corporate branding, design and logos, to the world of sign-painting? Actually, in this post-credit crunch era its easy to imagine many financial institutions fantasizing about swapping the cold, discredited corporate typeface for the almost childlike appeal of handmade signage.

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Guest Blog Post by Image Source

James Friedman’s photographic series, Pleasures and Terrors of Kissing, feels like an encyclopedia or taxonomy of kissing, or the document created by an ethnographer – passionate, affectionate, oblivious. Shot in black and white, the series enables the viewer to focus on the stillness of the kiss – the awkwardness of the bystander faced with this bubble in space hints at a little bit of social chaos injected by the public display of private passion (‘where to look?’).

Lips are the border of inside and outside, and in the latter part of the 20th Century ‘the kiss’ has been celebrated in photography as a public window on a private emotion – think of the couple in Robert Doisneau’s Kiss By The Hotel De Ville. Or Alfred Eisenstaedt’s image of the sailor kissing the woman in the white dress in Times Square on V-J Day. It’s the ultimate ‘anti-social’ image, not in the sense of being destructive, but an image of two people recoiling from the social world, into their world, whose pleasure and terror is not the exclusion of every other human being, it’s more profound than simply exclusion – in the pleasure of the kiss no one else exists. And because kissing is done with eyes closed, it’s a feeling that is almost unrepresentable, that can’t be said, and only seen in the photograph.

Photographer James Friedman, Pleasures and Terrors of Kissing, no. 701
Photographer James Friedman, Pleasures and Terrors of Kissing, #701

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