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“You don’t take a photograph, you make it” -Ansel Adams

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Photographer JLPH / Cultura RF
Photographer JLPH / Cultura RF

It’s tempting to say that in 2014 Craft is big business, but of course Craft is always small business.

So when was it that we moved from the world of anonymous corporate branding, design and logos, to the world of sign-painting? Actually, in this post-credit crunch era its easy to imagine many financial institutions fantasizing about swapping the cold, discredited corporate typeface for the almost childlike appeal of handmade signage.

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Guest Blog Post by Image Source

James Friedman’s photographic series, Pleasures and Terrors of Kissing, feels like an encyclopedia or taxonomy of kissing, or the document created by an ethnographer – passionate, affectionate, oblivious. Shot in black and white, the series enables the viewer to focus on the stillness of the kiss – the awkwardness of the bystander faced with this bubble in space hints at a little bit of social chaos injected by the public display of private passion (‘where to look?’).

Lips are the border of inside and outside, and in the latter part of the 20th Century ‘the kiss’ has been celebrated in photography as a public window on a private emotion – think of the couple in Robert Doisneau’s Kiss By The Hotel De Ville. Or Alfred Eisenstaedt’s image of the sailor kissing the woman in the white dress in Times Square on V-J Day. It’s the ultimate ‘anti-social’ image, not in the sense of being destructive, but an image of two people recoiling from the social world, into their world, whose pleasure and terror is not the exclusion of every other human being, it’s more profound than simply exclusion – in the pleasure of the kiss no one else exists. And because kissing is done with eyes closed, it’s a feeling that is almost unrepresentable, that can’t be said, and only seen in the photograph.

Photographer James Friedman, Pleasures and Terrors of Kissing, no. 701
Photographer James Friedman, Pleasures and Terrors of Kissing, #701

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Guest Blog Post by Image Source

Seniors/Matures will change advertising, not just in the kinds of faces we are likely to see, or the stories that will be told – tone of voice will be markedly different. Welcome to the world of “Senior Kink”

There’s a line between the mocking and the eccentric that sensitive creatives carefully navigate. Let’s call this emotional and psychological line the “Kink”, were the line twists and bends into a shape that doesn’t fit with the linear. It’s a bit unexpected. It’s what happens when you get to a certain age, you’ve seen stuff before, the line of time starts repeating itself, there’s a certain unself-conscious freedom which comes from being less socially visible, less conventionally ‘beautiful’ or ‘handsome’ in advertising terms. Let’s call this twist in ageing “Senior Kink”.

Image_OneStill from Southern Comfort’s Whatever’s Comfortable Campaign

Wieden + Kennedy’s Southern Comfort are advertising pioneers of “Senior Kink” – a man walks across the beach, oblivious to everything, not least his own lack of style – shoes and socks – which by virtue of that becomes a style.

Image_TwoStill from Southern Comfort’s Whatever’s Comfortable Campaign

Or in the second iteration, the 50-something man in the snakeskin boots getting a hair massage and putting on his glasses to sneak a look at the attractive middle-aged woman sitting opposite. Or the third ad where the same man performs his ‘shadow’ Karate in the hairdresser, hair in colouring-foils, before retiring to his seat with a glass of Southern Comfort.

It’s no surprise that Beach picked up Gold at the Clios, at Cannes Lions and was the most successful ad at the recent British Arrows Craft Awards.

Why? Read more on the Image Source blog here.

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