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Graphic Design USA Magazine

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Guest Post by Image Source
By John O’Reilly

Couple holding hands and entering flowering garden
Container Plus / Ikon Images / IS09AJ8MM

The surge in popularity in illustration began in the mid 1990s, taking people to magical places. Here we explore some of the benchmark moments and look at the most popular ways illustration is used for effective communication.

It’s the month that Lawrence Zeegen and Caroline Roberts’ epic Fifty Years of Illustration gets published by Lawrence King, a book filled with illustration classics such as Klaus Voormann’s Revolver cover to Shepard Fairey’s Hope poster. But if we telescoped down to 15 years and some thumbnail sketches of drivers and moments here are five ideas as to why illustration has got so popular since the late 90s.

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CRB-416-DebbieMillman-LUXEproject-WME-16

Designer, artist, author and Design Matters radio show host Debbie Millman is the newest addition to the esteemed list of designers for The Luxe Project by MOO. Millman’s just launched collection, Word Play, offers MiniCards and Notecards, with 100% of the net proceeds going to the Joyful Heart Foundation.

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Guest Post by Image Source

As the world is getting craftier we look at three key moments in the emergence of Craft as a creative and commercial phenomenon. Consider these three pivotal moments in the emergence of Craft and the Handmade over the last 20 years, a Design moment, a production and retail moment, and a moment that merges sophisticated digital processes with a notion of the handmade.

1. Design: Stefan Sagmeister

During the mid to late 90s New York-based designer Stefan Sagmeister produced a series of works for clients that didn’t just go against the grain of modernist revivalism in design but chewed up the grain and spat it out, regurgitating design formulas as the playfully handcrafted. While designer David Carson unravelled the modern layout, Sagmeister took out his pen-knife and carved his initials in the tree.

Sagmeister’s handcrafted work feels both like a highly personal piece of communication but his Craft also attacks our conventional, common sense ideas of the kinds of materials Advertisers and Marketing people might use for messages. For example his poster for Lou Reed’s album Set the Twilight Reeling draws the the song titles over Reed’s face.

Stefan-Sagmeister-Set-the-Twilight-Reeling-1996-600x800
Stefan Sagmeister, Set the Twilight Reeling, 1996. From Sagmeister, by Peter Hall, Booth-Clibborn Editions, 2001

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